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Un angelo per Satana (1966) Online

Un angelo per Satana (1966) Online
Original Title :
Un angelo per Satana
Genre :
Movie / Horror / Mystery
Year :
1966
Directror :
Camillo Mastrocinque
Cast :
Barbara Steele,Anthony Steffen,Claudio Gora
Writer :
Luigi Emmanuele,Antonio Fogazzaro
Type :
Movie
Time :
1h 30min
Rating :
6.7/10
Un angelo per Satana (1966) Online

At the end of the 19th century, in a little Italian village by a lake an old statue is recovered. Soon a series of crimes start and the superstitious people of the village believe that the statue carries an ancient malediction ... {locallinks-homepage}
Cast overview:
Barbara Steele Barbara Steele - Harriet Montebruno / Belinda
Anthony Steffen Anthony Steffen - Roberto Merigi
Claudio Gora Claudio Gora - Conte Montebruno
Mario Brega Mario Brega - Carlo Lionesi
Marina Berti Marina Berti - Ilda, the Housekeeper (as Maureen Melrose)
Ursula Davis Ursula Davis - Rita
Vassili Karis Vassili Karis - Dario, the Teacher (as Vassili Karamesinis)
Aldo Berti Aldo Berti - Vittorio, the Gardener
Betty Delon Betty Delon - Barbara Lionesi
Antonio Corevi Antonio Corevi - Guglielmo, the Majordomo
Antonio Acqua Antonio Acqua - Sergente, the Guardian
Livia Rossetti Livia Rossetti - Natalia
Halina Zalewska Halina Zalewska - Luisa
Giovanna Lenzi Giovanna Lenzi - Maria


User reviews

Whiteflame

Whiteflame

A beautiful b&w mystery movie, shot in 1966, but looks like having been made in the 40s - which is perfectly alright for me in this case. Sculptor Roberto (Anthony 'Django' Steffen) arrives in a small village to restore an ancient statue. He meets a woman (Barbara 'Mask of Satan' Steele) who bears an amazing resemblance to the statue. Mysterious cases of death happen, and soon she is supposed to be a reborn witch by the superstitious villagers. Roberto doesn't believe that and starts looking for another explanation... In case you were worried because Jan de Bont's 'The Haunting' used too many computer FX, you should check out this movie instead (that is, if you ever find a copy of this rare gem), because you'll realize how well this kind of story works without digital toys.
Mave

Mave

Perhaps inspired by Mérimée's short story "La Venus D'Ille

and even more by French miniseries "Belphegor" ,"Un Angelo per Satana" is solid horror movie stuff;anyway with Barbara Steele,the most fascinating actress of the genre ,you cannot be wrong.Even when the screenplay is weak,she saves something from the wreckage.

Anyway the screenplay is well-constructed,with two final unexpected twists;the first pictures ,on the lugubrious lake, almost show a Dreyeresque influence .Steele is so subtle an actress you never know whether she is an angel or a demon who causes crimes,drownings,suicides and other horrors;this is a Gothic atmosphere with the De Rigueur events which happened a long time ago and became a curse for the inhabitants of the island .Recommanded for horror buffs.
Roram

Roram

This was "Scream Queen" Barbara Steele's last of nine Italian horror films (for the record, I've still got TERROR CREATURES FROM THE GRAVE [1965] and THE SHE-BEAST [1966] to catch up with) and the one that was hardest to come by until recently. With this in mind, the print on display still left a lot to be desired – panned & scanned, fuzzy picture quality and the audio filled with extraneous noise (particularly during the second half…where it seems that someone's tapping on computer keys somehow got mixed in with the film's soundtrack, recalling a similar incident found on the original DVD of SON OF Dracula [1943]!).

AN ANGEL FOR Satan – the title, by the way, is a misnomer – was also probably the last of the vintage Gothic Horror outings from this country to be shot in black-and-white (imbued with a touch of poetry not easily replicated by the more delirious color titles). Incidentally, I'd watched director Mastrocinque's sole other foray (also in monochrome) in the genre – the "Carmilla" adaptation CRYPT OF THE VAMPIRE (1963), starring another horror icon in Christopher Lee – which I remember liking quite a bit, but whose recording (made off late-night Italian TV) I subsequently foolishly erased. To get back to Steele's European output, a common thread running through most of them is that she plays a look-alike descendant of some diabolic ancestor (beginning with the very first, Mario Bava's seminal BLACK Sunday [1960]) – and this one's no exception though, in its case, she emerges to be more of a victim (which, I guess, is what the title is ultimately alluding to). Having mentioned Bava, while his one picture with Steele was the director's official debut, his swansong – the fascinating (made-for-TV) THE VENUS OF ILLE (1978) – actually shares much of its plot line with AN ANGEL FOR Satan! Indeed, here we also have the discovery of an ancient statue bringing a series of calamities upon a small community consumed by superstition – and where the blame is placed at the doorstep of newly-arrived Lady of the Manor Steele (since the figure was made in the image of her forebear).

An interesting (if unlikely) twist is that the woman of the past played by Marina Berti – who, jealous of Steele's popularity with the menfolk, had tried to destroy the statue but tumbled down along with it into the river beneath – also has a like-minded i.e. vindictive descendant (her ultimate fate, then, emerges to be predictably ironic). That said, the narrative makes it seem at first as if the old Berti has taken possession of the new Steele…until hero Anthony Steffen (the sculptor entrusted with restoring the icon) uncovers the whole scheme which also sees Steele's current guardian (Claudio Gora), enamored of Berti, involved (hypnotizing his charge into committing nefarious deeds so as to elicit the ire of the townspeople who, in getting rid of the girl, would make him legal proprietor of the estate!). Steele, in fact, is made to turn heads yet again – particularly those of the more gullible members of the community: village idiot, shy schoolteacher, his equally naïve girlfriend(!) and who also happens to be Steele's own personal maid, and the town strong-man. She seduces all (often by casually taking off her clothes in their presence – though we see next to nothing, screen permissiveness having only just been broken with the likes of THE PAWNBROKER [1965] and BLOW-UP [1966]) and 'causes' them to act in extreme ways – the first becomes a serial rapist/killer (on whom the villagers eventually turn en masse), the second commits suicide (in the classroom of all places!) as a result of the maid breaking off her relationship with him and the fourth sets fire to his own home (with the rest of the family still inside!).

By now, of course, Steele was well-versed in this type of role – so, it's no surprise that she turns in a typically multi-layered performance (with her striking looks intact). However, she's matched by the brooding Steffen (later a regular of Spaghetti Westerns and Gialli) – and, equally impressive is Francesco De Masi's evocative score (it's pure happenstance that several titles I've been watching in my ongoing "Euro-Cult" marathon bear his signature!).
Ranenast

Ranenast

Very glad to see this after so many years just reading about it. Was still operating under the impression that it was only available without subtitles, but seeing that Netflix was offering it, I added it to my queue and was very happy to find that it arrived with English subtitles.

It's beautiful, evocative, violent, and puzzling with Steele cutting quite the figure of death and destruction as Harriet fresh out of England to claim her inheritance somewhere on the Continent. For a film that I thought was going to be wearisome and talky considering its first 15 minutes or so of weary talk, it definitely found its stride and delivered on its promise once Steele's machinations--or Belinda's or...?--unfolded.

A great end of the week, Friday night flick and now one of my top three favorite Steele films.
Qus

Qus

"Un Angelo per Satana" aka. "An Angel For Satan of 1966 is the last of nine Italian Gothic Horror films starring the wonderful Barbara Steele, doubtlessly the greatest female Horror icon in cinema. Barbara Steele, who is capable of combining stunning beauty and unspeakable eeriness like none other (which makes her my favorite actress), starred in none less than three of the all-time greatest Horror masterpieces within a few years, namely Mario Bava's "La Maschera Del Demonio" (aka. "Black Sunday") in 1960, Roger Corman's "Pit And The Pendulum" (aside the great Vincent Price) in 1961 and Antonio Margheriti's "Danza Macabra" (aka. "Castle of Blood") in 1964. While "Un Angelo Per Satana" is not a masterpiece en par with the aforementioned films, or even other brilliant Gothic tales like "Nightmare Castle" ("Gli Amanti De Oltretomba", 1965), this is yet another eerie and great gem starring Steele. As in "La Maschera del Demonio" and "Nightmare Castle", Steele once again has a double-role in this one, and she is once again brilliant switching between pure innocence and pure evil.

The film is set in a 19th century Italian village set next to a lake, from which an old sculpture has been recovered. Invited by the local Count Montebruno (Claudio Gora), sculptor Roberto Merigi (Anthony Steffen) has come in order to restore the artwork, and immediately finds out that the villagers are afraid of a curse which is supposed to be placed upon the sculpture. The Count's beautiful niece Harriet (Barbara Steele) bears an amazing resemblance to the sculpture... "Un Angelo Per Satana" did not have a very high budget, and actually looks a few years older than being made in 1966. This is in no way a fault, however, as the film, which is filmed in beautifully uncanny settings, nonetheless maintains a tense and creepy atmosphere. This is one of only two Horror films director Camilllo Mastrocinque ever made, the other being "La Cripta e L'Incubo" (aka. "Crypt of the Vampire", 1964) starring Horror icon Christopher Lee. Even so, Mastrocinque was obviously perfectly capable of creating genuine creepiness and a Gothic atmosphere. As stated above, Barbara Steele is once again brilliant in her double role here. I am always getting quite monotonous when this favorite actress of mine is the topic, but she simply cannot be praised enough, in my opinion. Anthony Steffen, who is best known for starring in many Spaghetti Westerns as well as Emilio Miraglia's "The Night When Evelyn Came out of her Grave" ("La Notte Che Evelyn Uscì Dalla Tomba", 1971) fits well in the role of the hero, and the cast furthermore includes Mario Brega. Brega, who was part of some of the greatest Italian Westerns, including Leone's Dollar-Trilogy and Sergio Corbucci's "Il Grande Silenzio" (1968), once again plays a grumpy ruffian here. The settings are beautiful and eerie, especially the lake, and the photography is very nicely done. The most convincing reason to see "Un Angelo Per Satana" is, of course, Barbara Steele (more than reason enough for me!), but the film is also great in other aspects. A definite must-see for my fellow fans of Italian Gothic Horror and Barbara Steele, "Un Angelo Per Satana" is a creepy and great gem that comes with my highest recommendations.
Bloodfire

Bloodfire

Fabulous b/w Italian Gothic that is beautifully shot and has a marvellously evocative soundtrack. Perhaps slightly too leisurely paced at the start with too many interiors but this is nit picking and very mean for a film that at times reminded me of Bava's The Whip And The Body. Yes, that sort of intensity and sexual tension. Oh and I haven't even mentioned what would have made the film so watchable even without all that. Barbara Steele! This has to be one of her most notable roles (dual roles, again, actually) and she shines both as the innocent and the depraved equally. Her pretty personal maid and the handsome co-star both work hard but become almost invisible when this woman is on screen. It's a well told tale set on an Italian lake with much ado about a statue salvaged from the waters and an associated curse. Great stuff. Magnificent ending.
Wizard

Wizard

An Angel for Satan is the rarest, and therefore hardest to find of all the Gothic horror films that Barbara Steele made in the sixties; but hunting it down was certainly worth the time and effort as this film is right up there with Danse Macabre and Black Sunday as one of the best films that the horror icon made! Director Camillo Mastrocinque had worked in the Gothic horror genre previously with the somewhat less than brilliant effort Terror in the Crypt in 1964; but it would appear he'd done some homework on the genre since then as this film is much better. The story focuses on a little Italian village. A statue belonging to a rich family has been recovered from the local lake after a heat wave, and Roberto Merigi has been called in to restore it; which coincides with the return of Harriet Montebruno; the daughter of the statue's owner. There is a story of a curse surrounding the statue, and the locals believe that the village itself will become cursed if it is ever recovered from the lake. Strange things then start happening in the village.

The key thing for this genre, and indeed the best thing about this film, is atmosphere. Director Camillo Mastrocinque succeeds admirably in bathing the film in a thick and foreboding atmosphere; which is helped by a great score from Francesco De Masi. The plot is spread rather thinly and the film puts its main focus on the central characters, which works well. Barbara Steele is, of course, the star of the show and aside from looking better than ever, also provides the film with its main story lines. Starring alongside Steele is the great Anthony Steffen, who provides a strong male lead. The film is basically a mystery thriller with horror elements tied in; the horror of course coming mostly from the atmosphere and direction. The plot does flow well and the film is always interesting, though my only real criticism of the film comes from the fact that more isn't made of the curse. There's a gorgeous sequence explaining how it came about, but that's the only real mention and it's a bit of a shame. Otherwise, however, An Angel for Satan is an exceptional Gothic horror film and comes highly recommended to anyone that enjoys films like this!
Danrad

Danrad

Although cult actress Barbara Steele appeared in 14 frightening films during the course of her career, the nine Italian Gothic-style pictures that she starred in during the early to mid-'60s are the ones primarily responsible for her current title: the Queen of Horror. Starting with the Mario Bava wonder "Black Sunday" in 1960, and then on to "The Horrible Dr. Hichcock," its sequel "The Ghost," "Castle of Blood," "The Long Hair of Death," "Terror Creatures From the Grave," "Nightmare Castle," "She Beast" and finally "An Angel for Satan" in 1966, Steele's streak of grisly horror films is one that no actress had enjoyed before...or has surpassed since. The last of those nine, "An Angel for Satan," is apparently the true rarity of the bunch, never having been released in any form for home viewing except in its original Italian...and without subtitles. Fortunately, for Barbara's legion of fans worldwide, the outfit known as Midnight Choir has recently released the film in a gorgeous print, with very adequate subtitling, AND paired with the 1964 film "The Long Hair of Death" (poorly dubbed) on the same DVD, for one superbly well-matched double feature. A look at "Angel" will quickly reveal what a wonderful actress Steele had become by the end of this streak, and how deserving the picture was itself for its rescue from relative oblivion.

In the film, a handsome sculptor named Roberto Merigi (solidly portrayed by Anthony Steffen) arrives in the town of Montebruno (in the northern Italian lakes region, I am guessing), in an indeterminate time period (late 1800s?). He has been commissioned by the local Count (Claudio Gora) to restore a statue that had recently been discovered in the town's lake; strangely enough, the statue is the exact image of the Count's beautiful young ward, Harriet (played by our Babs), whose ancestor, Madelina, had posed for the statue some 200 years before. Back then, Madelina's plain-Jane cousin, Belinda, in a jealous rage, had cursed the statue and then been killed by it when the statue toppled into the lake. And now, as Merigi labors to repair the long-lost piece, sweet Harriet seemingly becomes influenced by the spirit of the lustful, hate-filled Belinda! Demon possessed, she soon drives the village idiot to commit rape and murder, wrecks her maid's romance with the local schoolteacher, destroys the marriage of a father of five, drives a man to suicide and sexually seduces that same maid! No wonder the village is soon referring to Harriet as "la strega"...the witch!

As in several other of these Italian Gothic affairs, here, Steele plays what are essentially two discrete roles, and she is just terrific in both of them. The moments of Belinda possession come on quite suddenly, and Barbara manages the transformations with great finesse indeed. How effectively she conveys the lust and hatred of Belinda! The cunning subterfuges that she concocts to destroy the love and happiness of those around her are truly the products of a wicked mind, and Barbara, pro that she had become by this point, conveys that wickedness with seeming ease. As in all her horror films, Steele steals every scene that she appears in, and is surely the film's main selling point. But "An Angel for Satan" boasts several other winning features. It has been directed with panache by Camillo Mastrocinque, displays some top-notch production values (particularly those lavishly appointed chambers in the Count's villa), and features a lovely score by Francesco De Masi that alternates with music of a decidedly eerier character. The picture gives us several startling/horrific moments--including the schoolchildren's discovery of a hanging man, as well as the pitchfork death of an ax-wielding maniac--and one truly bravura, creepy sequence; the one in which the spirit of Belinda speaks to Roberto during a raging thunderstorm, while her face on a painted portrait moves and twitches ever so subtly. "An Angel for Satan" would actually be a perfect horror film, I feel, if it weren't for its final segment, which features a double-twist ending that negates much of the film's supernatural aura for one of completely unconvincing mundanity; truly, an aberration in Babs' Gothic canon. Still, the film remains eminently respectable, watchable and fun, and of course a must for all Barbara Steele completists. Despite her modern-day disavowal of the title, a film like this (and its eight predecessors, of course) serves as proof positive that Barbara Steele truly IS "the Queen of Horror"....
Silly Dog

Silly Dog

I must admit, I collect horrors from the beginning of filming, my oldest is from 1911 until now but the fifties and the sixties never were my thing. That period was filled with too much blah blah horrors were nothing happens or were filled with guys in a monster suite. Thanks to Chris in the UK I was given the opportunity to watch this flick. It is a rare film to find, strange because Barbara Steele plays in it. Wellknown for her part in Black Sunday made in 1960. The fact that it is an Italian film made it even harder to find it with subtitles, my copy has it. In fact, for me it's a ghost story. Beautifully filmed and exceptionally for an Italian flick with perfect sound, no overdubs or hiss. All actors are believable. Don't expect a gory or bloody movie. In those days most of the horrors weren't bloody. Except for the start in the states of the slashers with Blood Feast (1963). Steele plays a perfect role written for her and the plot is also really nice, it's only in the last minutes that you will know what's really going on. It's more suspense then horror, only a few seconds there is blood. There are also no effects used in this film and that's why it has his cult following, Steele is also a reason. In some way it get's you by the throat. If you can catch a copy watch it but first transfer yourself in those days. Oh yeah, it's shot in black and white which gives it an older look (40's). Start searching my friends.
Llbery

Llbery

The late 19th century. Skeptical and pragmatic sculptor Robert (superbly played by Anthony Steffen) arrives in a small country village to restore an ancient statue to its former glory. Roberto falls for naive and innocent heiress Harriet (a first-rate performance by the ravishing Barbara Steele), whose evil ancestor Belinda was the original model for the statue. As the statue nears completion, Harriet becomes more like the cunning, devious, manipulative and flat-out no-good Belinda. Is Harriet possessed by Belinda's vengeful and malevolent spirit? Or is there something else going on? Director Camillo Mastrocinque, who also co-wrote the clever and compelling script with Giuseppe Mangoine, relates the complex and engrossing story at a steady pace, does a fine job of creating and sustaining a spooky brooding atmosphere throughout, and delivers a potent and vivid evocation of the remote rural region and the fearful superstitious people who populate the area. Steele excels in her tasty dual role; she brings a charming grace to Harriet and portrays the devilishly enticing Belinda with splendidly nasty relish. The supporting cast likewise contribute sound work: Claudio Gora as the wise, kindly Count Montebruno, Ursula Davis as sweet, fetching maid Rita, Marina Berti as poised governess Illa, Aldo Berti as friendly school teacher Dario, and Mario Brega as brutish, ill-tempered local strongman Carlo. The surprise twist ending is genuinely startling. Giuseppe Aquari's striking black and white cinematography and Francesco De Masi's elegant score give this movie extra class. Well worth seeing.
Leceri

Leceri

More of a gothic thriller than an outright horror movie, this Italian grand guignole starring Barbara Steele is an enjoyable look at the sins of lust among the entitled elite in the late 1800's. It surrounds the fishing out of a statue of a beautiful ancestor and Barbara Steele's returns to her family estate for the first time since she was a little girl. Initially charming and kind, she quickly turns, setting all the men up against each other out of lust which results in murders and suicide. As the audience learns in a mesmerizing flashback sequence, steals ancestor was the victim of a curse of a jealous relative who was filled with passion but lacked in desirability. Steele becomes more determined in her secret hatred of all men, accusing innocent ones of rape and enticing others to do her evil work for her.

Engrossing and completely haunting, this is a less horrific version of the dozen of other films that Steele made around this time, reminding me more of a Gainsborough/ Margaret Lockwood gothic drama was it seems of a new arrival who stirs everything up. The one horror element has her being accused by the villagers of being a witch due to all the evil going on around them from the moment she returns. Steele is bewitching as always, and the possibilities are endless of the truth beyond her soulless character. the black and white photography makes it all the more Gossett, adding an old fashioned look to a theme that utilizes modern twists and elements of the 1960's.
Warianys

Warianys

Here's a question all us folks must face at some point: If we fell in love with a beautiful woman, should we be concerned that all of a sudden they seem possessed by another person, or should we be grateful that this other seems more kinkier and a bit filthier than the other one?

This is the problem facing Anthony Steffen, a sculptor paid to stay at the requisite creepy Italian villa to restore a 200 year old statue found in the lake next to the villa. Strangely, this statue really looks like the just returned Countess Harriet (Steele, in her last Italian horror role), and Steffen was in there before she started calling herself Belinda and hitting on every living thing with a pulse.

For example, local fool Victor, for whom Belinda strips off then beats around the face with a riding crop for looking at her. Or, for another example, the timid teacher Dario, whom she steals from her own maid, Kate? Or how about her maid, Kate? Or how about Carlo, who starts off as Head of the Angry Villager Witch-Baiting Team who then ends up on team Strega? She even manages to turn one of them into a serial killer (he's not very good at it, however).

At first this starts becoming a little boring until everyone goes mental and starts kill themselves and each other. Only Anthony Steffen, a spaghetti Western leading man who is much better in these Giallo type films, can figure it out! Also, this is the first time I've seen Mario Brega in a non-Leone Western (He's the big fat sidekick of the bad guy in everyone of them). For a moment him and Steffen forget they are in a horror film and have a right old punch up, so that was good.

This is a fairly bloodless and at first seemingly boring film that picks up a lot of steam once the corpses start piling up (including a suicide victim being found by children, and indeed children being locked up in a house and burned). It's also different in that although it does have the usual big villa, it's really Barabarabarabaarabarabrabraara Steele who is the haunted one. Nice way to finish off the career. You never get to see her boobs or bum even once.
Celace

Celace

It felt GREAT to finally watch another good old-fashioned and stylish Italian Gothic tale from the golden sixties, particularly one that is starring everyone's favorite and utmost beautiful horror muse Barbara Steele! Being a tremendous fan of the sub genre, the era, the country and of course the actress, I've seen all the obvious classics (like "Black Sunday", "She-Beast", "Castle of Blood", "The Long Hair of Death") many years ago already, but "An Angel for Satan" has always been the most difficult one to track down. I can't really explain why, but somehow this title was more obscure than Steele's other cult classics. This certainly cannot have anything to do with the quality level, though! Admittedly I might be slightly biased, and I have watched a lot of miserable crap lately, but "An Angel for Satan" is a genuine horror experience that has it all: an intriguing plot, a macabre atmosphere from start to finish, sinister set-pieces and music, breath-taking women and moody cinematography. Antony Steffen ("Django the Bastard") depicts a sculptor named Roberto Merigi who arrives in a small lakeside village somewhere late in the 19th century. He got hired by the wealthy Count Montebruno in order to restore a nearly 200-year-old statue that was recovered from within the lake. Roberto immediately experiences the hostility of the superstitious villagers, as they strongly believe that the statue is cursed and will bring death & mayhem upon the community. Montebruno's daughter Harriet also arrives in town, and she bears a striking resemblance with the statue. She is the descendant of a ravishing 17th century Countess Belinda, and Harriet clearly inherited the family's good looks, for whom the statue initially was made. The countess and her lover were killed by a jealous sister who later drowned in the lake with the statue during a storm. Inevitably, the curse soon turns to be frightfully real and mysterious things occur in the little town. Harriet alternately is her lovely self, but also possessed by the heinous spirit of Belinda. As Belinda she sows unrest and mayhem in town, which quickly leads to much worse. "An Angel for Satan" is a fantastic film with a few excellent and surprising plot twists, including the denouement, but also stylishly shot footage. The film is in masterful black and white, with ominous music and sound effects, and the performances are all stellar.

**Spoiler** The most morbid and unnerving scene was undoubtedly the discovery of the poor teacher's body hanging from the ceiling. How badly can you drive someone over the edge that he commits suicide in the one place where he knows he'll be discovered by the innocent children he cared so much about?