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Here Come the Brides Online

Here Come the Brides  Online
Original Title :
Here Come the Brides
Genre :
TV Series / Adventure / Western / Comedy
Cast :
Robert Brown,Bobby Sherman,David Soul
Type :
TV Series
Time :
1h
Rating :
7.6/10
Here Come the Brides Online

To avoid losing their logging crew, the Bolt brothers bring 100 prospective brides from Massachusetts to Seattle, using money borrowed from sawmill owner Stempel. Should one of the girls decide to go home, or should they fail to meet Stempel's timber quotas, they will still lose their mountain to him.
Complete series cast summary:
Robert Brown Robert Brown - Jason Bolt 52 episodes, 1968-1970
Bobby Sherman Bobby Sherman - Jeremy Bolt 52 episodes, 1968-1970
David Soul David Soul - Joshua Bolt 52 episodes, 1968-1970
Bridget Hanley Bridget Hanley - Candy Pruitt 52 episodes, 1968-1970
Mark Lenard Mark Lenard - Aaron Stempel 52 episodes, 1968-1970
Joan Blondell Joan Blondell - Lottie Hatfield 52 episodes, 1968-1970
Susan Tolsky Susan Tolsky - Biddie / - 47 episodes, 1968-1970
Henry Beckman Henry Beckman - Capt. Roland Francis Clancey / - 34 episodes, 1968-1970
Hoke Howell Hoke Howell - Ben / - 33 episodes, 1968-1970

According to the 1985 "Star Trek" novel "Ishmael" by Barbara Hambly, Aaron Stempel (spelled Stemple in the novel) is an ancestor of Amanda Grayson, Spock's mother. In the novel, Spock prevented the Klingons from assassinating Stempel and altering history. This is an intertextual in-joke as Stempel was played by Mark Lenard, who also played Spock's father Ambassador Sarek beginning in Звёздный путь: Journey to Babel (1967).

The opening theme music was changed in the middle of the first season from an instrumental only version, to a version with lyrics.

It can be inferred that the Bolt brothers immigrated to the USA from Scotland with their parents as young boys; when they receive a surprise visit from their Uncle Duncan (their father's twin), he reminisces about last seeing Jeremy as a toddler, and they reminisce about the old family estate in Scotland, as well as commenting that they never expected him to ever leave Scotland.

Though Bobby Sherman plays the youngest Bolt, he is one month older than David Soul, who plays the middle Bolt.

Capt. Clancy seems older than Jason Bolt, but in reality Henry Beckman and Robert Brown are about the same age. Likewise, Denver Pyle, who played the Bolt brothers' Uncle Duncan, their father's twin brother, was only six years older than Robert Brown.

The show was inspired by events in the life of Asa Mercer, first president of the Territorial University of Washington, Washington State Senator, and resident of Seattle. Mercer made three 19th-century ocean voyages that sailed to New England to recruit eligible women to move to the Pacific Northwest, where there was an extreme imbalance in the ratio of men to women. The first group reached Seattle on May 16, 1864. Mercer made two more trips that were less successful but married one of the women, Annie Stephens. This story is portrayed in Death Valley Days: Mercer Girl (1957).


User reviews

Yar

Yar

"Here Come the Brides" sounded like one of the worst bits of schlock to hit the tube when it was being advertised for TV's fall line-up in the 1968-69 season. At the enlightened age of 12, I was far too sophisticated for such drivel. Imagine my surprise when, being forced to watch the show by a controlling older sister, I actually LIKED it. It fast became my favorite program at that time -- I was enormously moved by its heart and its humanity. By today's standards it probably seems pretty tame and trite stuff, but back then, it was different and courageous and had a voice that spoke to me. My favorite episode was titled, I think, "The Rainmaker". Jack Albertson guest starred as The Rainmaker, the shyster who is nevertheless magical enough to cure Jeremy's (Bobby Sherman) stuttering by presenting him with a magic stone. When The Rainmaker is revealed as a fraud, Jeremy's faith is shattered, and his stuttering returns tenfold. That's when Big Brother Jason Bolt lovingly explains to Jeremy that neither The Rainmaker nor the Magic Stone cured Jeremy's stuttering -- Jeremy had done it on his own. Jeremy, convinced, launches into a passionate, and flawless, speech, defending The Rainmaker to the rest of Seattle. Corny? Yup. But I'll tell you what -- that episode of "Brides" helped this 12 year old to believe in himself. Those characters in "Brides", especially the Bolt Brothers, still live within me, and I'm grateful for it.
digytal soul

digytal soul

"Here Come the Brides" rates as one of my favorite shows of all time. The theme song, so beautifully crisp and clean, frequently resounds in my mind, although I can't remember all the words. The historical fiction genre is my favorite.

Robert Brown was outstanding as Jason Bolt. He was bold, handsome, intelligent and resourceful. Oh did I love Bridget Hanley. She was so sweet, pure and full of love for Jeremy. When something would upset her and the tears would drip down her cheeks, I wanted so badly to hug her.

Mark Lenard was classic as the villain -- stoic, miserly and always scheming to separate the Bolts from their mountain.

But seeing Joan Blondell in her later years was truly a gift. I later became enamored with classic movies and enjoyed her romps with James Cagney and in the Gold Diggers movies. She was a beauty in her day. In HCTB, she was matronly and domineering but in a kind and gentle way.

I wish there was a way to see some of the old episodes. I remember that it was in syndication for a short time back in the late 80s and I had the wherewithal to record 3 or 4.

The simple, honest messages that the show conveyed are lost today in a decadent sea of sex and vulgarity. I guess I'll just have to be thankful that I had the opportunity to see the show on a week-to-week basis during my high school days. I'll watch my episodes from time to time, fall in love with Candy all over again, enjoy the drunken escapades of Captain Clancy and catch the last vestiges of Joan Blondell's great career.
Cashoutmaster

Cashoutmaster

I remember the whole family sitting around watching this show (I think it was on Weds. nights at 8:00). It had something for everyone. Bridget Hanley for me and my brothers, Bobby Sherman and David Soul for my sisters.

Good stories, but the series tanked when Candy's brother and sister moved to Seattle. It obviously must not have done well in the ratings, as Jeremy and Candy were always toying with getting married, but I remember everyone in my school talking about it the next day.

I would also like to see some of the shows again to see just how good/bad they were.
Orll

Orll

I absolutely loved this show. Even though I was quite young, Robert Brown was the brother I was in love with. Could have cared less about Bobby Sherman and all the hoopla surrounding him.

I agree with everyone else....why can't this show be brought back on Nick-at-night, etc.? And what ever happened to Robert Brown???!!
Rigiot

Rigiot

I used to watch Here Comes the Brides as a kid and was very excited to see it coming out on DVD. Bobby Sherman was my first love and when I watched the series again it brought back many memories. I fell in love all over again and had to buy a Bobby Sherman CD. I love the wholesomeness of the show and the love that the brothers have for each other. Bridget Handley is excellent as Candy Pruitt. She is levelheaded and can solve the problems that the brides have. I love Biddy and her silliness. I love to hear her laugh she brings joy to the show. I love Lottie and the way she is a mother to the girls. She and Captain Clancy have a secret liking for each other and that brings a spark to the show. I wish we had shows like this now days. Thank you for the happy memories.
Cerana

Cerana

I loved this show growing up! I wish it would return to a place like TVLand! I've sent comments to TV Land asking them to consider running this show and would appreciate it if other fans would do the same, maybe that way if enough people write in, they will consider it! I also was an avid fan of the original Star Trek and would devour the books that were written and couldn't believe my good fortune when one of the books turned out to contain both Star Trek AND Here Come the Brides in it's story line...I've since misplaced that book and can't remember the title...so if anyone out there knows, I would appreciate an answer, you could email me at [email protected] Much appreciated!! Long Live Here Come the Brides and Star Trek!!!
Gietadia

Gietadia

Charming simplistic 60's western series whose purpose is to just entertain. There is usually some small lesson included but it's told in an easy going manner. Many well known actors who were just starting out pop up throughout the episodes. The main cast are all fine, some like David Soul who went on to other things, others like Bobby Sherman, who is very appealing, had a few big years and then left the business but they all work well together. Best of all is the great Joan Blondell full of sass as Lottie the saloon keeper and surrogate mother to the whole town. A nice reminder of when a series didn't have to have deep meaning and grit or be about people who had to be idiotic and mocked by the one of the leads. The excellent theme and credits are an added plus, really suited to the program from a time when shows tried to have a memorable opening so you knew right from the beginning you were watching something distinctive from everything else on TV.
Iarim

Iarim

I Loved the Series. It was a clean wholesome show. No vulgar language like in the movies today. I was just a kid and can still remember running to the tv to turn it on each week. I only wish that the series would come back to television as re-runs. So many other shows are re-run over and over, year after year, and yet I haven't seen "Here Come The Brides" re-run ever. Is there a reason for this?
Sardleem

Sardleem

Being FROM Seattle, I knew I would like this right away. In actual history a man named Asa Mercer did bring brides to Seattle, and did a good enough job to have my junior high school named after him. I got the DVD and not long after I began going down memory lane I decided this was a series I could share with my young grand daughters who seem to think that Laura and Mary Ingalls are related to them, they see and read them so much. My children weren't born yet when this was on so it is a delight to my daughter as well. For being almost 40 years old this program holds up a lot better than some of the stuff they are making right now. And has a "full" season of shows unlike right now too! Its not brain surgery but it qualifies as great entertainment!
Shaktit

Shaktit

An all-time favorite! First saw "Here Come the Brides" in 1968, and have loved it ever since. I find HCTB one of the best of that entire era, and has "aged" far better than many more recent shows. I don't think Screen Gems and ABC were ever quite sure what kind of show they had on their hands, an ambiguity that probably worked to the show's favor, since it managed to combine so many elements into one: rollicking fun comedy, action, bittersweet drama, western, and even some serious themes. A terrific, ensemble cast helped, which allowed the varied characters to be alternately featured, yet ultimately participating equally. HCTB is one of the few shows which I can honestly say that I like every major character! Each added their own special ingredient, making the whole a delight to partake in!

The Bolt brothers are well played by Robert Brown, David Soul, and Bobby Sherman, each balancing the others well. Excellent also are Bridget Hanley and Susan Tolsky as brides, veteran actress Joan Blondell as the saloon owner with a heart of gold, and Henry Beckman as a boozy Captain Clancy. Fine support from Mitzi Hoag, Bo Svenson, Hoke Howell, and all the various guest stars.

Mark Lenard, most remembered today for his participation in the "Star Trek" franchise, also lends great support as rival sawmill owner Aaron Stemple. Interesting to watch how the writers slowly changed Stemple's character from an unlikable baddie in the early series to a more complex "good bad-guy" who sometimes supports the Bolts in their efforts to build Seattle.

The writing on HCTB is almost uniformly excellent, especially during the 1st season. The writers don't follow classic TV formula of sticking to comedy or drama, instead they manage to infuse every episode with elements of both, finding a near flawless mix. Some episodes are delightfully fun, such as my personal favorite "The Log Jam," which is a real romp from start to finish. Others take a more serious tone, and even touch upon social issues (prejudice, racism, arson, early conservation), yet they're done subtly and with enough lighthearted moments so that the viewer isn't left feeling "beaten over the head" with the Message.

Since HCTB only lasted 2 seasons, it was never put in syndication, and took 20 years to be aired again nationally. I was delighted in the late 1980's to discover that The Family Channel was including it in their daytime lineup, and even more happy to find that the show was still so fresh and good! Since I worked weekdays, I had to set my VCR to tape the episodes, and eagerly looked forward to watching them every night. The first episode I was able to videotape was #9 "The Stand Off" (featuring "Ox" the lumberman), so it took a couple rotations thru the entire series on The Family Channel before I managed to collect them all, but it was worth it.

I definitely favor the 1st season over the 2nd. For one thing, the wager between the Bolts and Aaron Stemple was up, so a major plot dynamic was lost. The 2nd season also saw a change in emphasis from the brides getting married to more serious subjects (Jeremy kidnapped by a loony ex-soldier, Candy kidnapped by a hostile young gunslinger, a conservationist-minded man sabotaging the Bolts logging operation, etc). But it still was good, with episodes such as where Clancy has to act like he's a rich, polished businessman to impress his brother, a visiting priest (played by Bernard Fox, best known as "Dr Bombay" on "Bewitched"), or where the Bolt's Scottish uncle Duncan shows up in Seattle, bagpipe, kilts and all, to settle down and run their logging business.

Undoubtedly the worst change from seasons 1 to 2 was the inclusion of Candy's recently orphaned little brother and sister. Not only did it put a crimp in the Jeremy-Candy relationship, but the two actors they got to play the kids simply weren't very good, and they came off as both wooden and without charm. The only good thing was that they weren't written as the usual precocious brats, tossing off one-liners, that always seemed to populate sitcoms.

I was delighted when Sony decided to release the 1st season on DVD, so that I could replace my aging VHS episodes with crisp, clear ones.

One interesting thing about the DVD set is that, unlike Family Channel broadcasts, they are COMPLETE! Since commercial breaks in the 60's were shorter, more of the time-slot could be allotted to the show itself. By the 80's, The Family Channel had to edit down each HCTB episode from it's original length (approx 55 minutes) so that it would fit into the same time slot, yet accommodate far more commercials. So, in watching HCTB on DVD, I found many "new" scenes (to me)! True, the TV broadcasts didn't cut any of the essentials from episodes; but that extra 5 minutes DOES lend a little greater character development and plot detail, which is always enjoyable.

One other interesting tidbit, which many Seattle residents might be aware of, is that HCTB is actually based (though VERY loosely) on historic fact. Back in the 1860's an enterprising young Seattle man named Asa Mercer DID travel east to bring back women to the largely male populated Seattle (in fact, he actually made two such expeditions, totaling about 75 women). Many Seattle residents today can trace their lineage back to a "Mercer Girl", and Mercer himself is remembered by downtown's Mercer Street, and Lake Washington's Mercer Island.
Kazigrel

Kazigrel

I like all the people in the tv show. My favorite actor in the show is Bobby Sherman. My favorite actress is Bridget Hanley. It's one of my favorite shows of all times.

I only wish they would put the episodes on videos, so I could see the the tv shows again.

Thank you, From Here come the Brides fan
Gamba

Gamba

"Here come the Brides was one of my favorite shows,I wish that they would bring it back to either Nick at night or T.V. land. Wasn't the original story line for the series taken from the movie "Seven Brides for Seven Brothers?" Also I think I remember seeing in the beginning of the series"New Bedford" as referring to where the brides were from?
Visonima

Visonima

HERE COME THE BRIDES

First Telecast: September 25,1968

Last Telecast: April 3, 1970

Number of Episodes: 52 In Color

Produced by Screen Gems/Columbia Pictures Television for ABC-TV

Comment: It made have a one of the most terrible titles to every hit the tubes,but it was one of the most wholesome family-oriented shows to premiere for the 1968-1969 season. For the two years that this show was on the air,the action-adventure laced comedy-western series HERE COMES THE BRIDES was a show that took placed west of the Mississippi since the series takes place in the Washington-state territory of Seattle. The series starred Robert Brown as Jason Bolt,and this was the show that launched the careers of not only David Soul,but Bobby Sherman who became a HUGE teen idol during it's run. Producer Bob Claver,who also served as executive producer along with Paul Junger Witt and Stan Schwimmer brought to audiences a down to earth family style show that included some western adventure and excitement in some of the episodes. It was the same Bob Claver who also behind after this series went off the air the family-oriented series "The Partridge Family" that premiered on ABC in the fall of 1970. Robert Brown was outstanding as Jason Bolt. He was indeed the matinée idol type: bold,handsome,intelligent and resourceful when it came to defending his honor,and his brothers in some tight situations. Bridget Hanley was the girl every guy wanted to fall in love with while Mark Lenard was classic as the villain--stoic,miserly and always scheming after one thing..anything to get even with the Bolts and to get the territory and the land for himself. Down right evil. But seeing the great Joan Blondell(a veteran of Hollywood's golden age of the 1930's and 1940's) as the Madame was in a classic by itself. The series had some good stories with some great action sequences added in. A Must See!
Zargelynd

Zargelynd

Everybody else seems to either love the series or hate it, passionately either way. Personally, I simply find it mildly interesting, better than a lot of what I've seen, but by no means spectacular. It is, of course, loosely (the operative word) based on the early history of Seattle, and on various projects (including, but not limited to the best known group, the "Mercer Girls") that enticed young, unmarried (or widowed) women to Seattle, to marry the settlers.

One interesting bit of trivia (and a probable reason why the series was as good as it was): several of the regular cast members had made guest appearances on Star Trek, some years earlier. Mark Lenard (Aaron Stempel) had played both Sarek and the first Romulan Commander; David Soul had appeared in "The Apple"; Robert Brown had played Lazarus in "The Alternative Factor."
Darkshaper

Darkshaper

It's the 1860s, and the Bolt brothers own a big logging company in Seattle. Their workers aren't happy, however, because the town (population: 152) is short on women, so the Bolts decide to bring 100 marriageable young ladies all the way from Massachusetts. They can't pay for the trip, so their arch enemy Aaron Stempel agrees to finance it on the condition that if any of the ladies leaves within a year, he gets the Bolt's timber-filled mountain.

This adorable family comedy from 1968 is still as much fun as ever. Barrel-chested Robert Brown plays the oldest Bolt brother and he's big and brawny and looks just like a lumberjack should. David Soul is the sensitive middle brother and the youngest Bolt is played by teen idol Bobby Sherman; his character is sweet and shy and stammers. Wonderful Mark Lenard plays the smiling villain Aaron Stempel. With Hugo Montenegro's rousing music and gorgeous colors (the ladies' ice cream-colored dresses and the deep greens and browns of the woods), it feels more like a movie than a TV series.

The show is similar in tone to "Seven Brides for Seven Brothers" with burly he-men, dainty ladies, and rip-roaring fun. Will the girls all find husbands? Will they all stay a year? Highly recommended.
Kaim

Kaim

This program started out with a very strong cast and good story lines the first season & then in season 2 went off into limbo. It was a show I enjoyed the first season, then lost interest in it when the cast shifted. I am not sure if it was contracts or what that made that happen.

Robert Brown, David Soul & Bobby Sherman were up and coming actors when this show started. As the Bolt brothers, they were a very good team. They board Captain Clancys ship & go to Boston to get 100 brides for the men in Seattle as they have no women. When they get the women back to Seattle, all kinds of little things happen. That includes the evil Stemple trying to throw the Bolt brothers out of business & create a monopoly on the lumber industry & the women.

While some of this sounds rough, the women are all New England Puritan types headed by Matron Joan Blondell. Joan is considered the star because by this time she was a grand dame of the screen. Candy Pruitt is consider the hot young virgin with eyes for Jeremy Bolt, and Bitty is the daft comedy relief woman who even has trouble trying to score desperate Seattle men with her own craziness.

The catchy theme song & wild Northwest country themes are what caught me into this program while it ran. Candy was good eye candy though a prude compared to the genie I had eyes for. The show had good plot lines early on. Sadly, Season 2 went away from season 1 & the show went off. Would imagine unless there are legal issues the DVD of these should arrive sometime. The series was slickly produced and veteran Wild Wild West director Irving J Moore was behind the camera.

It is hard to believe Robert Brown is 90 years old this year(2016) and most of the younger women in this cast are in their 70's if they are still with us.
ALAN

ALAN

This was a great show to watch and remember watching it as a kid in moving to TN in 1984. It was on the CBN Network aka now ABC Family. No sex, violence, and/or four-letter words. Robert Brown started out as the star of the show. But then the focus turned to Bobby Sherman as he indeed added sex appeal and became more of the focus of the show. Can't wait for the DVD release!! Future Starsky & Hutch star David Soul is in a secondary role as the middle brother. Loved Lonne as she was the mother figure of the brides. As well as the man that played the captain as he added comic relief to the show. Again this show will remind me of when I first moved to TN and started loving this show. Great family show to watch.
Froststalker

Froststalker

I used to watch this show where I was a young girl. I loved it and would love to see it on Nick at Night. I think the kids would love it also. I also liked the show Emergency.Both shows showed good morals and good taste and that is what all programs need. I was young when I watched these programs but they stuck out I'm my memory and I still smile when I think about them.I also liked the show Big Valley and it is still shown on Nick At Night sometimes. I also liked the Adams Family. That was a comedy that the whole family could watch and nobody would get offended.The other series that I would love to see come back to television is the Rescue 911. I don't see it anymore and a number of lives were saved because of that show.
Bad Sunny

Bad Sunny

I used to watch Here Come The Brides when I was in JHS and HS. I just saw it again on Antenna TV and had forgotten how good it was. I had a huge crush on Bobby Sherman, although I liked Robert Brown and David Soul too. My friend Candy was so excited that a character had the same name as she did, especially since it was Bridget Hanley, who was absolutely gorgeous.

I hope it keeps being shown on Antenna TV because it is a well written, well acted show, with lots of heart. A few people have said only season one is available. Hopefully, by now, season two is also, because I have to get it. Until then, I will watch it on Antenna TV.
Ance

Ance

The Book was "Ishmael" by Barbara Hambly. "The 'Enterprise' is on a peaceful mission at Starbase 12 when a bizarre cosmic phenomenon causes a Klingon ship to suddenly vanish--with Spock aboard for the ride. Spock's last message from the Klingon ship is cryptic and frightening. The Klingons are traveling to the past, searching for the one man who holds vital key to the future. If they can kill that man, the course of history will be changed-- and the Federation will be destroyed." Contains references to "Here come the Brides" and major characters from the first season including the Bolt Brothers, Candy Pruitt, Biddy Cloom, Aaron Stemple, Lottie Hatfield and Capt. Clancey.
Bluecliff

Bluecliff

It's commonly said of shows like this that they were products of a more innocent era. But it wasn't really so innocent; and as far as TV went, what now looks like innocence was closer to mannerliness: TV was conceived as a guest in the home, and minded its words accordingly. Its purveyors assumed they could and should satisfy everyone, and that everyone shared the same proprieties and ideals to be satisfied. Gradually, this cohesive culture was eroded by a more divisive one; but while it lasted, it produced shows like Here Come the Brides.

This was one of the last examples of the TV Western, now an extinct form, and, to viewers unacquainted with it, HCTB must look like all the others. But it didn't at the time. It seemed to have a dash, a bounce, and a sweetness not seen before. In fact, the first episode brought me more plain, simple happiness than anything on TV before or after. Home videotaping didn't then exist, but I made an audiotape of the episode, and wherever I went, if I was feeling lonely, I'd give it a listen, and it always cheered me.

Before airing, the show was promoted like Petticoat Junction, as a broad farce with cuties. It had that aspect; but what the promos didn't disclose was that it was a rollicking frontier comedy of the North to Alaska school: a mixture of swagger and sweetness--in effect, a musical without the songs. Which is just what it was. In the late fifties George Sidney, the director of several musicals, had planned another one, to star Burt Lancaster and Shirley Jones. The writer was N. Richard Nash, in whose frontier comedy The Rainmaker Lancaster had played the title character; the hero of this story, Jason Bolt, bore him more than a slight resemblance. A script and songs were drafted, but ultimately the production was dropped. The script no doubt was filed, and a few years later someone seeking properties to develop happened across it; hence this show.

The producer, Bob Claver, had done an earlier Western, Iron Horse, with a similar period flavor and a similar confidence-man hero. For HCTB he brought in E. W. Swackhamer to direct the pilot episode (later, he would direct all of the show's best ones). Whether Swackhamer influenced the casting is not recorded, but it seems likely, since he was friends with both its leading man, Robert Brown, and leading lady, Bridget Hanley (whom he afterwards married). I expect it was the combination of the three that gave the show its exuberance. Brown seemed born to the part of a honey-tongued backwoods cavalier, and Hanley showed exactly the right kind of gumption for a blend of women's advocate, den mother, and understanding sweetheart.

A show doesn't always remain in the same state, and HCTB passed through at least three: the pilot; the season subsequent; and the one after that (which unfortunately was the last). The pilot looked as if it would make a fun-filled series as it stood; one episode was attempted on that theory, and failed (though it was reworked and shown later), the characters running around aimlessly and with motives that made little sense. Someone--probably script editor William Blinn, to judge from his other work--reoriented the show toward community, friendship, love, and family. The leading character went from hoodwinking the townsfolk to becoming their leading light; his logger gang, originally outsiders (like the brothers in Seven Brides for Seven Brothers), became the town's most frequent denizens.

The first half of that season was undoubtedly the series' apex. It had two strong supporting characters who later left: hard-headed, good-hearted logger Big Swede and prim but highly principled schoolmarm Miss Essie. It also featured striking turns by guest actors, and utilized a wide range of scriptwriters, who had fun exploring the characters before everything became fixed and while things could still be stretched for the heck of it.

The TV pilot made two big changes from the proposed movie: the hero's love interest, a shady lady, was eliminated; and his big task became, not to import the "brides" he had promised the town, but to keep them there for a year. This gimmick must have seemed certain to guarantee one season; and it did. Without it, the show slowly came apart in its second year.

Not that the gimmick had worked in practice. The local mill owner was out to send the brides packing so he could collect the agreed-upon forfeit, a timber-rich mountain. But he was a notorious skinflint who had paid to have them brought, and gained from their presence there as much as anybody. He made a few half-hearted attempts to tempt one or another girl away; but none was believable, and soon the show gave up on the idea.

What it became about instead was logging, and courtship--but mainly, fun: impersonations; impostures; wagers; contests. In the second season it sobered up slightly and settled into a long string of swindles and abductions (the producer wanted action but TV was in one of its anti-violence phases, so nobody could be killed).

The three leading actors made strong impressions; this show was the best any of them ever did by a long way. The others besides Brown were the pop singer Bobby Sherman, who showed a surprising depth of feeling as the insecure, guileless, sometimes quick-tempered youngest brother, and David Soul as the middle one, who began as a cocky lothario and then turned into a kind of fulcrum holding the excesses of the others in balance: reserved, occasionally too smug in his own intelligence, but generally acting as the voice of reason. However, the most touching scenes were Sherman's--as when, after being cured of his speech impediment by a visiting medicine man, he learns his benefactor was a charlatan and reverts to stuttering again--publicly, in his girlfriend's hearing. Her heart goes out to him; ours do, too.
Faegal

Faegal

I have no idea why I was madly in love with this show. It wasn't just my huge crush on David Soul (I was 10), but I loved everything about it. When people ask me for my top favorite shows of all time, this is always on the list.

I couldn't wait for the show each week...and have no idea why it was cancelled so soon (it was Emmy nominated). I can still sing the theme song and I just ordered the first season from Amazon.

I just loved everything about this show, from the Bolt brothers, to Candy and Biddy and Lonnie and even Aaron Stempel. I loved the scenery and the scripts.

Okay I was only 10 but it captured my imagination like few shows have done before or after. I have no idea what the lure was, but it was very powerful and has not faded over time.
Jeronashe

Jeronashe

I couldn't agree more... I was just thinking last night as I was watching and reminiscing... The quality of the film was fabulous, the story line is great, by far out paces any thing out there today, and forget about reality programming...

I myself would rather watch this than repeats while the writers are on strike... and I don't think it is just emotion either....

What really surprises me is that it did not go into syndication...unless I am wrong about that...

I am also a fan of Little House on the Prarie... are we starting to see a pattern? Very happy to have this
Vikus

Vikus

Living in New Bedford, Massachusetts most of my life I was drawn instantly to "Here Come The Brides" because it brought my hometown back into prominence. This show holds up well after almost 40 years and the color on the DVD is well-preserved. There's nothing like watching a DVD on your computer and this series looks sensational. I wish there was a way to get today's kids interested in shows like " Here Come The Brides" because they recall a much more innocent time when shows could be entertaining without resorting to graphic depictions of crimes. I enjoy those shows as well but still find the old shows enjoyable. It's also fun to see people in older shows who started out in minor roles and went on to become bigger stars, in this case Vic Tayback played one of the many loggers, then went on to play Mel on "Alice"
Mavegar

Mavegar

I thoroughly enjoyed watching Season 1 on DVD, even my husband didn't seem to mind watching! We need Season 2, need closure. Email Sony at [email protected] to let them know how many of us appreciate the wholesomeness of this TV show. Ask them to release Season 2 for us! We don't get choices like this anymore, and even though it's definitely not realistic, it's still a blast to watch, even at my age! The Bolt Brothers were great, doing what it took to keep their town alive. They showed their caring about their town, and about each other. You don't see much of that anymore. Yes, there was what appeared to be a lot of drinking at Lottie's, but rarely anything any worse than that. Watching Jeremy and Candy's romance was just wonderful to a tween-ager. My mother let me stay up late on a school night to see this program. Please email Sony and request the release of Season 2. With customer demand, maybe it will come out sooner rather than later~!